Law and Enforcement

CHIEF SEC’S CHAUFFEUR REPRIMANDED FOR ILLEGAL PARKING

Occupy Queen’s Road Central: Hong Kong’s second-in-command blocks an entire carriageway of a central thoroughfare while he tours a National Security teacher training centre

Hong Kong’s second-in-command came under fire this week after his car was spotted illegally parked on Queen’s Road Central for about an hour last Tuesday afternoon while he visited a National Security teacher training centre in Sheung Wan.

Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung Kin-por’s black Lexus blocked the right-hand lane of the one-way Queen’s Road Central for up to an hour as he toured an education centre charged with developing Hong Kong’s “Respecting the Law, Reinforcing the Rule of Law” Teacher Training Programme.

Cheung’s office played down the incident, claiming he had parked “briefly by the roadside” while visiting the centre.

However, eyewitnesses claim his visit lasted far longer than a brief stop.

A local shopkeeper told Transit Jam that Cheung had been parked there “quite a while”, with another eyewitness claiming he’d been there “around an hour”.

The government prioritises students’ “awareness of national security and the obligation to abide by the law,” says Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung while his Lexus is illegally parked outside

Cheung’s own agenda reveals a longer visit than his office suggests, with his official engagement including a tour of the education centre, a speech to assembled guests, a photocall-cum-gift-ceremony and a private meeting with education centre management.

“The [government] attaches great importance to publicity, promotion and education on the Constitution and the Basic Law, with a view to enabling members of the public, in particular young people, to have a comprehensive, accurate and in-depth understanding of the Constitution and the Basic Law,” Cheung told guests at the event.

The Chief Secretary’s office says it has “reminded the chauffeur that he must be careful and strictly abide by the traffic regulations.”

When asked why Hong Kong’s Number Two was still driving a petrol-driven car, seemingly against the “Popularization of Electric Vehicles” policy released earlier this year, a spokesperson said “Senior Government Officials, including the CS, will take the lead in switching to EVs when their petrol saloon cars are due for replacement”.

The spokesperson did not respond to further questions on when this might be.

 

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